Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine

Vision is the key – A chat with Braden Myus

By Mira Postolache

Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine

As the visionary director at the helm of his Los Angeles-based emerging luxury label, Braden Myus showcases a masterful blend of heritage reverence and daring experimentation in the creation of exquisite garments tailored for a fresh cohort of discerning fashion enthusiasts. 

His distinctive approach harmoniously marries the allure of tradition with a pioneering spirit, resulting in a transformative reinvention of established fashion paradigms for both men’s and women’s apparel. Drawing on a rich background that includes stints at prestigious fashion houses like Ye and Hubble Studio, Braden Myus demonstrates a profound understanding of design intricacies, seamlessly translating conceptual visions into tangible pieces that resonate with a profound, narrative-driven ethos, setting his work apart as a testament to artistry and ingenuity.

Renowned for its avant-garde yet enduring aesthetic, the MYUS brand consistently delivers a captivating juxtaposition of timeless elegance and innovative design. Each season, traditional silhouettes are reimagined through artful asymmetry, inventive layering techniques, and a deep-rooted commitment to storytelling through fashion. Crafted with meticulous care, the collection is conceived in Los Angeles and meticulously brought to life by skilled artisans in Italy and Peru, utilizing only the finest materials such as super 140 wool, sumptuous alpaca wool, luxurious cashmeres, and premium organic cottons. Inspired by the enduring legacy of literary greats like Arthur Miller, the collection artfully marries the structured discipline of corporate attire with the ephemeral beauty of contemplative introspection. The resulting garments exude a captivating complexity, inviting wearers to immerse themselves in a narrative-rich landscape where fashion transcends mere utility, emerging instead as a powerful form of self-expression and storytelling. In Braden Myus’ hands, clothing becomes a canvas onto which the intricate tapestry of life’s experiences and aspirations is artfully woven, creating a timeless sartorial narrative that captivates and inspires. 

“In the realm of sales, a salesman must dream, dear boy. It’s an inherent aspect of the profession.”

Taking cues from Arthur Miller’s iconic works, MYUS’ “Death of a Salesman” collection for the Fall/Winter ’24 season marries the structured world of corporate culture with the transient beauty of introspective contemplation. Crafted in Los Angeles and brought to life by skilled artisans in Italy and Peru, the collection boasts premium materials like super 140 wool, alpaca wool, cashmere, and organic cotton, reflecting a meticulous attention to detail and a dedication to sourcing only the finest fabrics. Blurring the lines between stagecraft and tailoring, the collection culminates in a show-stopping piece — the charcoal wool Lapel Dress, a breathtaking creation featuring over 100 lapels intricately combined to form a stunning ball gown.

Read below our exclusive interview with Braden Myus for Vanity Teen: 

Can you tell us about your journey as a fashion designer and how you came to establish your Los Angeles-based brand?

It has been an unconventional route for sure. In 2017, I moved to LA to play soccer for the Los Angeles Galaxy UPSL team where I met a lot of great people from Adidas. When I re-tore my meniscus, I began styling with Adidas. That opened up a world of different opportunities in the industry. After talking with friend Guillermo Andrade and others, I decided to start designing my first collection for what was at the time, Braden Myus Ltd. I had studied art/graphic design in college so I was mainly sketching on Adobe Illustrator. I was introduced to Charlie Giannetti and he helped turn my sketches into real pieces of clothing.  This is when I really learned what it meant to create a garment. I drove all over Los Angeles every day for 6 months going to fabric mills, dye houses, pattern houses etc. learning and studying. When I completed my first collection in 2018, I had the opportunity to have a showroom in Paris with Kid Super and Siberia Hills; it was an amazing experience, but I realized I was getting ahead of myself. I took a step back from the large scale label and decided to focus on the craft, taking online pattern making and draping courses while working for a clothing production company.  I wanted to know all of the lost crafts and techniques so that when I went back to the label, I would have something to say through my work.  I was designing tech packs, pattern drafting, doing R&D with a lot of dye tests and creating new fabrics for a plethora of different brands.  I started having a lot of commissions from private clientele.  When clients began to request 1 of 1 pieces, I started to fall in love with the idea of creating a namesake label that focused on the intricacies and story telling of a garment.  I grew up reading classic literature and plays.  The attention to detail and world they could create was always beautiful to me.  I was obsessed with coming of age stories and French film and decided that MYUS would be my outlet to direct and tell stories.  That was what always intrigued me from Gaultier, Margiela and Mcqueen, they were not just making clothes, they were creating a world.  I reimagined the label and decided to relaunch as MYUS in 2022.  The central theme being that each collection would derive from an overarching premise of storytelling.  Reinventing and experimenting with timeless pieces through the lens of a character, mythology or theme that resonates with me.  That gave birth to Ode To A Swan, an expose on swans throughout mythology and ballet.  

Your bio mentions that you have a command of heritage and experimentation in the production of luxury garments. How do you blend the novel and timeless elements in your designs?

Generally it starts with the inspiration for the collection.  I do not pick styles or silhouettes until I have been inspired by the overall theme and what story I am trying to tell.  For example, when I was studying Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman I was enthralled with the coats, ties, robes and briefcases from the 1940’s.  The history of the suit and business wear has always interested me and I wanted to challenge myself to reinterpret it in a new way.  Because I primarily make “womenswear” I knew I wanted to take the elements of the classic salesman attire and the heritage of New York & London tailoring but make it effeminate.  I started draping dresses in super 140 wool and applying small details such as petal pleating from the inside of a 1940’s briefcase interior lining, reimagined the use of the lapel for the function but wanted to utilize the shape in different locations throughout the pieces.  This started to shape the overall collection.  I also love seeing how different people layer their garments–a throughline for my collections is an interpretation of built in styling. For example, I grew up seeing men wrap their button up shirts around their waist while traveling and putting their blazer over top.  I wanted to make a coat that had a built-in button down that wraps around the waist but was built into the lining.  I think subtle changes and experimentation goes a long way in developing new heritage and new classics in fashion.

You have worked with renowned personalities such as Ye and Hubble Studio. How has collaborating with these contemporary zeniths influenced your creative process?

I’ve always found myself working in dynamic environments;   This was definitely my experience while working with Ye and Hubble Studios.  There are so many projects going on at once, and in different facets of the creative process, from music videos to Sunday Service to collections, to Coachella.  The list goes on and they are all overlapping.  In that environment you have to be able to multitask at an efficient pace and understand that there is no down time.  You have to be on at all times.  I personally thrive in that environment because I think that is how my brain operates.  I believe all of my experiences working in these environments and with these creatives has reassured my creative process and allowed me to continue to create and alter things up to the last minute.  I believe that is how you can achieve something beautiful.  Never be content until the last moment before the show or whatever the project, then enjoy the outcome.

The collection from MYUS is known for its avant-garde yet timeless approach to dressing. Could you elaborate on how you achieve this balance?

I have always been captivated by the fabric and the details of garments.  So naturally I think I was drawn to more timeless designs and structure.  For my work in the industry for other brands I was doing a lot of graphic design, wash treatments and embroidery.  For MYUS I am not really interested in the graphic elements of design.  I want to challenge myself and the epitome of the label by creating beautiful and timeless designs that still are able to cut through the noise.  This led to my obsession with taking timeless and “old” silhouettes and interpreting them in a new way, like my newest collection “Death of a Salesman”.  When I can take a dress or a coat and add another element to it, whether that be creating a three dimensional coat with multiple layers to give the illusion of the wearer in three separate coats, or adding a functioning sleeve as a cinched waist element, I believe that is where avant garde is able to seamlessly integrate with timeless design. 

Your collection draws inspiration from Arthur Miller’s classic, merging the structure of corporate life with existential introspection. Can you explain how you translate these conceptual ideas into tangible garments that reflect both rigidity and ephemeral beauty?

I loved this specific line in the play, “If personal meaning, in this cheerleader society, lies in success, then failure must threaten identity itself.”  It stuck out to me because the stereotypical role, especially in that time period, was for a man to have a successful career and be the rock for his family.  Yet we can all see the fragility of the man and how ultimately he could not “hold it all together.”  I wanted to express that through the clothes.  Using classic suiting wools and motifs but reinterpreting what we visualize as “business attire” helped to shape the direction.  Draping the majority of the collection while keeping the structure and interfacing of classic tailoring helped me translate softness with rigidity.  I had Connor (my right hand man) spend hours with me watching Savile Row videos on interfacing and manipulating structure so we could change the perspective of traditional tailoring.  I think the juxtaposition of a blazer as a skirt or a shawl with a lapel helps the viewer see both sides of the coin.  It is aspirational beauty mixed with human fragility.

Your collection is designed in Los Angeles and produced in Italy and Peru. Could you tell us about your meticulous approach to materials and why you choose to work with specific fabrics such as wool, alpaca wool, cashmeres, and organic cottons?

I am very meticulous in my approach to design, details and fabric.  MYUS will never be a heavily graphic or “loud” brand per say.  I want to evoke emotion and inquisition through subtlety in detail.  Suiting fabrics such as super 140 wool, wool cashmere, and alpaca gives immense options for me to provide the highest level of quality while presenting garments in new ways.  I love the idea of using “classic” fabrics in completely different garments and non-traditional constructions.  Fabric manipulation is generally seen more in lightweight fabrics such as silk and linen.  The challenge here was using much heavier fabrics and giving them a new life, a new perspective.  

How do you see your brand resonating with the hungry, new generation of consumers who are seeking a fresh take on fashion?

Through the world building and story telling of MYUS.  I want it to inspire thought and enable consumers to feel like they are a part of something more than just another clothing brand.  I believe it challenges the industry to do more than just put out what they know will sell.  I think that will resonate with consumers that care about what they are buying and why they are buying it. 

Avant-garde fashion often pushes boundaries, challenging conventional norms. How do you ensure that the avant-garde aspects of your designs remain appealing and wearable for a broad range of consumers?

I am not sure if I can totally ensure all of my designs will remain “wearable” for a broad range of consumers.  I like to challenge the idea of wearability, and how I convey that idea through the theme and story of the collection.  I can guarantee that we will continue to push boundaries and create beautiful garments that have deeper meanings.  I believe that we keep it relevant and intriguing to a range of consumers. 

As a designer who values narrative design, how does storytelling play a role in your creative process? How do you incorporate this aspect into your collections?

It is throughout the whole process honestly.  It dictates every aspect of the design.  I research ad nauseum to be historically accurate and to apply old techniques to each garment in an updated way.  I want the pieces to make someone feel like they are stepping into another world, or hopefully, the new world. 

Could you elaborate on your perspective on the future of fashion and where you see your brand evolving within the industry?

I am a hopeless romantic when it comes to the fashion industry.  I believe people truly want to see beautiful and thought provoking things.  I see the industry beginning to care again about the detail, where the fabric came from, why the pieces were made in the first place.  MYUS is aiming to create what people WILL want, not what they currently want.  I hope we can continue that and evolve with the ever changing landscape of the industry.  

Finally, what advice would you give to aspiring fashion designers who want to create their own unique mark in the industry?

Create what you want, never compromise.  When you have a vision for something, you have to see it through.  It is easy to get caught up in the here and now, and the struggles that go along with it.  I promise it will be more fulfilling if you stay true to your convictions and why you started designing in the first place. 

A letter to your future self. 

Remember to enjoy the little moments.  Try and enjoy the present.  Remember to zoom out and not always take everything so seriously.  Be compassionate and remember the ones who were there through it all.

Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vision is the key - A chat with Braden Myus Vanity Teen 虚荣青年 Lifestyle & new faces magazine
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